I had acne scar subcision on my forehead and temples yesterday and I wanted to show you the video! I’ve been trying to upload these, but as always, my issue with making anything online is ALWAYS THE TECHNOLOGICAL PART, not the motivation to do so. I’m struggling to figure out how to get these here on my blog.

Acne scar subcision is an important, yet less known technique for significantly reducing the appearance of atrophic acne scars.

No portion of these videos may be copied or used without my consent. These videos are a bit graphic (at least by my taste).

If you have acne scars, forget microdermabrasion, forget LASERS, forget peels and most certainly forget any and every topical cream/gel/lotion/concoction on the market!

The BEST THING FOR deeper acne scars is ACNE SCAR SUBCISION. Hands down. I cannot emphasize this enough. Fraxel laser will certainly help smooth out your skin, but that comes with a cost: For me it was a “thinner, over-all look” to my face; a more “gaunt look”, if you will. Many of us with numerous and deep acne scars had thicker skin with more volume—especially when we were teenagers! Once you have a few laser treatments (I had Fraxel) you’ll see a slight change in the thickness of your skin—and you might not be happy with it!

The first time I learned about subcision for acne scars was in 2000. I read about the technique online. I was living in Seattle then and I remember calling every dermatology and medispa clinic I could find asking “Whether they performed subcision for acne scars” and “how much it cost”.

The response, even in a thriving metro like Seattle was pretty much the same, “We suggest you try LASER treatment.” Or, “Maybe if you have one or two scars the doc can subcise them, but she’s not going to want to spend all day addressing acne scars all over your face in a piecemeal fashion.” They must have not been performing very many subcisions in those days so the technique was not yet really developed or refined.

If you’ve endured the brutal agony (both physical and mental) of nodular-cystic acne and the subsequent scars, find someone competent in acne scar subcision. This could be a plastic surgeon, a general MD, a nurse, or, in my case, an Esthetician-turned medical assistant.

The medical assistant I had was AMAZING! I’ve looked everywhere for this kind of treatment but have had difficulty finding anyone who knows how to effectively wield a needle or blunt-tip cannula underneath the surface of the skin to break up the scar tissue HORIZONTALLY.

Remember, dermal rollers/needles and LASERS all work vertically. You need to address acne scars horizontally TOO because fibrous bands of scar tissue attach and pull from all directions which add to the distortion and disfigurement of the skin! This fact is often overlooked in the esthetics world.

Acne scars have thick bands of fibrous tissue that tether them to the deeper regions of the dermis. This, combined with tissue loss from inflammation creates the indentations, depressions, rolling, boxcar and ice pick scars on the surface of the skin.

Deep rolling and boxcar acne scars respond wonderfully to subcision because the underlying bands of scar tissue are being slashed apart, broken down and “subcised”.

The body will initiate a healing response where the scar tissue has been subcised. The skin that was once pulled down by fibrous tissue can lift itself up, reducing the appearance of the depression. Clotting factors will arrive on the scene, a hematoma will form and then matrix remodeling can occur. Collagen and elastin tissue will form like scaffolding where the scar has been subcised. It will not be perfect—but the scar will not be quite as deep.

In this video I’m having my medical assistant perform acne scar subcision on my forehead and temples.

It was a very painful experience (at least for me) because I had really deep bands of scar tissue in my face that needed to be broken up. Thankfully, she did inject a lidocaine numbing agent in each area prior to subcision.

My Acne Scar Videos

 

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